Headers may cause balance issues

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sciencedaily.com | Jul 12 @ 18:22

More research is needed to understand the long-term effects of these repetitive head impacts and potentially develop interventions to address them. The study found that players exposed to more repetitive head impacts were more affected by the vestibular stimulation while walking, suggesting subtle balance problems. "The question is, how do we get these really subtle effects and how do they manifest to later life complications? "Santos and Caccese said more research is needed to learn about the effects of repetitive head impact. "We are looking to understand the relationship between head impacts and concussion," said Santos, a doctoral student in the biomechanics and movement science interdisciplinary program.

New species may arise from rapid mitochondrial evolution

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sciencedaily.com | Jul 12 @ 18:22

Mutations in the mitochondrial genes may cause these interactions to be subpar and thus cause reductions in metabolic performance. Genetic research at Oregon State University has shed new light on how isolated populations of the same species evolve toward reproductive incompatibility and thus become separate species. Scientists sequenced the entire genome of a Pacific tidepool crustacean, Tigriopus californicus, a model species for differentiation based on geographic separation -- an early stage of one species becoming multiple species. "T. californicus populations along the Pacific coast of North America have mitochondrial genes that differ widely from one population to the next -- there are lots of mutations relative to each other. "In order for ATP to be produced properly in a cell, a few hundred other genes encoded in the nucleus must interact directly with the 37 mitochondrial genes.

Rats trail behind shrews, monkeys, and humans in visual problem solving

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sciencedaily.com | Jul 12 @ 18:22

Rats take a fundamentally different approach toward solving a simple visual discrimination task than tree shrews, monkeys, and humans, according to a comparative study of the four mammal species published in eNeuro. The work could have important implications for the translation of research in animal models to humans. These findings suggest that rats use their brains differently than the other species in the context of this particular task. Although it is thought that learning in mice and rats can overcome initial species differences on a task, few studies have directly tested this idea. While the macaques and tree shrews used similar visual learning strategies and their performance improved over time, rats (Rattus norvegicus) were instead focused on where they had previously received a food reward and their performance did not improve.

Nike put its energy-returning foam into a shoe you can train in

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popsci.com | Jul 12 @ 18:15

There’s been countless renditions of the Pegasus shoe since then, including the most recent Pegasus 35 that went on sale last month. For those long hours, runners need a good training shoe: Unlike a racing shoe which is meant to propel a runner forward, a training shoe should feel softer, expertly absorbing the repeated pounding on the pavement to lessen impact on the joints. With that as inspiration, Nike built on its long standing shoe, the Pegasus—a sneaker first introduced in 1983 that was meant for every runner. According to Nike, elite runners like Kipchoge, wanted a training shoe whose energy return and bounce resembled that of the Vaporfly Elite that he races in but without the extra spring of the carbon fiber plate. The shoe features a newly designed midsole (the chunk of foam sandwiched in the middle of the shoe between the insole and the outer layer) dubbed ZoomX as well as a curved carbon-fiber plate.

What Is Green Exercise?

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scientificamerican.com | Jul 12 @ 17:15

»Continie reading “What Is Green Exercise?” on QuickAndDirtyTips.com Not only did this setting make me grateful to live where I do but it also inspired me to dig into some research on how green spaces and exercise can have a synergistic effect on us humans. Being that I am a movement and fitness nerd, I started doing a mental tally of how many people were either frolicking (i.e. And of the 70% of frolickers, easily 99% of them were smiling, laughing, and completely unaware of their current rating of perceived exertion (told you I am a nerd). It was basically a 70/30 split in favor of frolicking.

Capturing this incredible star cluster required lasers and a bendable mirror

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popsci.com | Jul 12 @ 16:40

“This allows us to get much sharper images than we could get without adaptive optics.” Muzic says. “For adaptive optics to work, it needs a bright star either inside or very close to your object. “Adaptive optics has a real time computer that is calculating the effect of the turbulence on the wavelength,” Muzic says. GRAAL works to counteract that turbulence using a technology called adaptive optics. The snapshot of the star cluster, called RCW 38, is among the sharpest and deepest images ever taken of the area.

Why It's So Hard to Junk Bad Decisions--Edging Closer to Understanding "Sunk Cost"

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scientificamerican.com | Jul 12 @ 16:25

Some of their most recent findings, published Thursday in Science, show rats, mice and humans all exhibit sunk cost behavior. “A lot of explanation for the sunk cost effect has been that people don’t like wasting precious resources,” Sweis says. Their analyses also suggest both rodents and humans have separate decision-making processes that are not all susceptible to sunk cost. The findings also indicated that sunk cost is not applied to all aspects of a decision. Taken together, the findings of the experiments suggest rats, mice and humans are all vulnerable to sunk costs.

Uber is right to rethink its self-driving operations

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technologyreview.com | Jul 12 @ 16:19

Uber is reportedly laying off its driverless cars operators in Pittsburgh, the city at the center of its self-driving project. Obstacles ahead: Uber launched its self-driving vehicle project in 2016, and I got to sit behind the wheel of one its first cars as it careened around the streets of Pittsburgh. Most damningly, according to an official report, the car saw the pedestrian but simply chose not to react. About 100 people will be laid off, and replaced by 55 “mission specialists” trained to offer more technical feedback to vehicle developers. One of its cars struck and killed a pedestrian in Tempe, Arizona earlier this year.

Open and Shut Case

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scientificamerican.com | Jul 12 @ 16:00

But with climate change, we’re not only judge and jury—we’re the victims, and the culprits too. We can reduce our sentence through good behavior—radically slashing greenhouse gas emissions and decarbonizing our economy. But if you don’t believe people have affected the climate, you need a coherent alternate explanation for the changes we’ve seen. The science of climate change detection and attribution—climate detective work—has advanced to the point that we can now confidently blame human activities for some individual extreme events. Greenhouse gas emissions have continued to increase, and they continue to be the prime suspect behind global warming.

ESPN is going to air the first e-sports league final match ever in prime time

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technologyreview.com | Jul 12 @ 15:54

The news: On July 27, ESPN will be the first TV network to air a professional gaming contest in prime time. The Overwatch League Grand Finals will be aired on the main stage of television sports. On the other hand, professional gaming is thriving without traditional broadcasting methods, instead using live-streaming platforms like Twitch to amass millions of views. Some background: The Overwatch League has been modeled after a traditional sports league—while others have clans that come and go, Overwatch created teams associated with cities that are in things for the long haul. But if e-sports wants to go mainstream, TV is still the most obvious avenue to do so.

India’s new net neutrality regime puts the US to shame

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technologyreview.com | Jul 12 @ 15:51

The country’s framework comes into force just as America has scrapped its own net neutrality rules. Sadly, the Trump administration dumped America’s federal net neutrality regime last month. The (few) exceptions: India’s also banning “zero rating,” which lets companies pay internet providers to give people access to some services for free. Why this matters: As we’ve argued before, without net neutrality rules small startups will be badly handicapped against deep-pocketed businesses that can easily afford to pay for internet “fast lanes.” That harms both competition and innovation. India’s move will hopefully reinforce the determination of US states to create their own rules to replace it.

New model quantifies communities' vulnerability to the spread of fire

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sciencedaily.com | Jul 12 @ 15:34

Firefighters know all too well that fires spread quickly, igniting chains of forestland made vulnerable by dry weather, and driven by wind. They hope their model could add to the strategic toolbox that protects lives and livelihoods from destructive fires. "Our ultimate motivation is to highlight new strategies to mitigate potential risk for wildland-urban interface fires, which has historically been a one-size-fits-all approach," Mahmoud said. Disaster-mitigation experts in Colorado State University's Walter Scott, Jr. College of Engineering wanted to bring attention to the complexity of the so-called wildland-urban interface of fires. The researchers used data from the 1991 Tunnel Fire that destroyed parts of Oakland, California, to test and validate their model.

Bioengineers create pathway to personalized medicine

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sciencedaily.com | Jul 12 @ 15:34

It's known as cell-free protein synthesis, or CFPS, and it has potential to provide sustainable ways to make chemicals, medicines and biomaterials. "A major advance of this work is that our cell-free extracts contain all of the molecular machinery for protein synthesis and protein glycosylation," Stark said. The resulting extracts enabled a simplified reaction scheme, which the team has dubbed cell-free glycoprotein synthesis (CFGpS). "Even in developed countries like the U.S., the move toward personalized medicine makes this type of on-demand drug production protocol attractive. "In bacterial cell engineering, you're constantly in a tug of war," Jewett said.

Today's deals: rechargeable batteries, wireless chargers, air mattresses

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popsci.com | Jul 12 @ 15:30

Certified refurbished Kindle Kindle Paperwhite Amazon Buy Now! Air mattresses Etekcity Amazon Buy Now! Wireless chargers RAVPower Amazon Buy Now! Rechargeable AAA batteries Eneloop Amazon Buy Now! Headphone deals Avantree Amazon Buy Now!

Coral reefs face yet another threat: island rats depleting their poop supply

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popsci.com | Jul 12 @ 15:30

This new story of rats and reefs underlines how far-reaching these changes are likely to be. Those islands with rats have something like one or two seabirds per hectare (107,639 square feet), while those without rats have 1,000 or more in the same area. Teasing out the ecological ripple effects of these newer and more numerous examples of the Anthropocene will be harder than in the finely-worked Chagos Islands study of Nick Graham and co. The fish in turn then graze the reefs and keep a healthy balance between seaweed and the island-building corals. These reefs, therefore, are more prone to be smothered by seaweed, and to have less healthy corals.

The dusky gopher frog will be the next Supreme Court's first environmental test

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popsci.com | Jul 12 @ 14:30

In July 2017, Weyerhaeuser, a timber company, petitioned the Supreme Court to overturn this decision. New types of cases Kennedy’s departure may not change any outcomes if some recent significant climate-change cases end up before the Supreme Court, says Burger. U.S. Supreme Court The highest in the land. Fish and Wildlife Service will be the first environmental-protection case of a new Supreme Court bench. PixabaySix years ago, the Obama administration tagged 1,500 acres of private Louisiana land as “critical habitat” for the dusky gopher frog, one of the world’s most-endangered animals.

Discovery of Massive Granite Sarcophagus Presents Mystery of Who Is Inside

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scientificamerican.com | Jul 12 @ 14:00

A massive black granite sarcophagus and a sculpture of a man who may be buried inside have been discovered in a tomb in Alexandria, Egypt. The discovery leaves archaeologists with a series of mysteries: Who is buried inside the sarcophagus? The granite sarcophagus looks foreboding: It’s nearly 9 feet long, 5 feet wide and 6 feet tall (2.7 by 1.5 by 1.8 meters). In this case, the sarcophagus appears not to have been opened yet, giving archaeologists a chance to study its contents and the person inside it. And, it may be the largest sarcophagus ever discovered in Alexandria, said Mostafa Waziri, general secretary of Egypt’s Supreme Council of Antiquities, in a statement released by Egypt’s antiquities ministry.

Satellite-Lofting Startup Will Build US Launch Site

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space.com | Jul 12 @ 13:50

The small-satellite launch provider Rocket Lab plans to build a new launch site in the United States, the company announced on Tuesday (July 10). Once a site is selected, Rocket Lab will have to construct a launch tower specially tailored to the Electron rocket. A Rocket Lab Electron rocket lifts off on Jan. 20, 2018, from what is currently the company's only launch facility, located on New Zealand's Māhia Peninsula. After that, Launch Complex 2 will be able to launch rockets monthly. For comparison, Launch Complex 1 in New Zealand can launch one rocket every 72 hours.

Martian 'Ghost Dunes' Could Preserve Signs of Ancient Life

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space.com | Jul 12 @ 13:37

So just the shape and size tell us that these are features that are coming from an ancient dune system. Could pits hold evidence of ancient Mars life? These 'ghost dunes' remain preserved because of their composition. Inside this sand could be signs of ancient life, protected from the radiation-heavy Mars environment. These pits likely used to be sand dunes — each one the size of the U.S. Capitol building, according to researchers.

Alaska Wants to Fight Warming While Still Drilling for Oil

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scientificamerican.com | Jul 12 @ 13:30

Begich has said over the years that Alaskan Democrats are “different.” Support for oil drilling is among the key reasons. We just got busy.”Although he supports oil drilling in the Arctic, Begich said he does not support drilling in environmentally sensitive places such as Bristol Bay. As for Walker’s climate task force, Begich said: “When I was mayor of Anchorage, I did not form a task force to work on this issue. I think that has affected our politics in ways that are just very profound.”None of the candidates running to be Alaska’s governor opposes oil drilling in the Arctic. “Every action that we can take no matter how small is important and ultimately beneficial.”But for the politicians running to be Alaska’s governor, that doesn’t mean oil drilling should stop.

Space Calendar 2018: Launches, Sky Events & More

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space.com | Jul 12 @ 13:00

Spot the International Space Station, Hubble Space Telescope and other satellites in the sky above with this satellite tracker. Falcon 9 rocket will launch the communications satellite from Cape Canaveral, Florida for Qatar's national satellite communications company Es'hailSat. A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Es'hail 2 communications satellite from Cape Canaveral, Florida for Qatar's national satellite communications company Es'hailSat. A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket will launch the Arabsat 6A communications satellite from Kennedy Space Center's historic Pad 39A. The uncrewed cargo vehicle will deliver equipment and supplies to the International Space Station.

The Sad Reason Kangaroos Are Acting Drunk

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livescience.com | Jul 12 @ 12:47

Researchers extensively documented phalaris toxicity in eastern gray kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) in December 2014, in a study published in the Australian Veterinary Journal. Some kangaroos in southeastern Australia are acting wonky, almost as if they were drunk. But while livestock can recover from the toxic effect of Phalaris grass, the neurological damage that kangaroos suffer is thought to be irreversible, according to the Guardian. The explanation for their unusual behavior is a grim one: They were apparently poisoned by Phalaris grass — also known as canary grass — a genus of pasture grasses that is highly toxic to the large marsupials, the Guardian reported. Their "drunken" condition is called phalaris toxicity, or "the staggers," and it is also seen in domesticated animals such as sheep and cattle that graze in pastures where the dangerous non-native grasses grow.

Parental controls do not stop teens from seeing pornography

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sciencedaily.com | Jul 12 @ 12:46

Though the use of Internet filtering tools is widespread, there has been no conclusive evidence on their effectiveness until now. "Internet filtering tools are expensive to develop and maintain, and can easily 'underblock' due to the constant development of new ways of sharing content. While Internet filtering may seem to be an intuitively good solution, it's disappointing that the evidence does not back that up. "It's important to consider the efficacy of Internet filtering," says Dr Victoria Nash, co-author on the study. "More studies need to be done to test Internet filtering in an experimental setting, done in accordance to Open Science principles," says Przybylski.

VERITAS supplies critical piece to neutrino discovery puzzle

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sciencedaily.com | Jul 12 @ 12:45

On September 22, 2017 the IceCube Neutrino Observatory, a cubic-kilometer neutrino telescope located at the South Pole, detected a high-energy neutrino of potential astrophysical origin. Eventually, the MAGIC observatory made a detection of much higher-energy gamma rays about two weeks after the neutrino detection, while VERITAS, H.E.S.S. The VERITAS array has confirmed the detection of gamma rays from the vicinity of a supermassive black hole. "The detection of gamma rays coincident with neutrinos is tantalizing, since both particles must be produced in the generation of cosmic rays. However, the observation of a single neutrino by itself is not enough for IceCube to claim the detection of a source.

Breakthrough in the search for cosmic particle accelerators

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sciencedaily.com | Jul 12 @ 12:45

Sure enough, they were able for the first time to assign a celestial object to the direction from which a high-energy cosmic neutrino had arrived. The joint observation campaign was triggered by a single neutrino that had been recorded by the IceCube neutrino telescope at the South Pole, on 22 September 2017. " The programme for the efficient follow-up observation of neutrinos using gamma-ray telescopes was developed by Bernardini's group. " Together with the single event of September 2017, the IceCube data now provides the best experimental evidence to date that active galaxies are in fact sources of high-energy cosmic neutrinos. ""Cosmic neutrinos are messengers from the high-energy universe.

Quantum dot white LEDs achieve record efficiency

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sciencedaily.com | Jul 12 @ 12:45

"Advantages of quantum dotsTo create white light with today's LEDs, blue and yellow light are combined by adding a yellowish phosphor-based coating to blue LEDs. Unlike phosphors, quantum dots generate pure colors because they emit only in a narrow portion of the spectrum. The new LEDs use commercially available blue LEDs combined with flexible lenses filled with a solution of nano-sized semiconductor particles called quantum dots. The researchers showed that their liquid-based white LEDs could achieve an efficiency double that of LEDs that incorporate quantum dots in solid films. "Our new LEDs reached a higher efficiency level than other quantum dot-based white LEDs," said Nizamoglu.

How ocean warmth triggers glacial melting far away

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sciencedaily.com | Jul 12 @ 12:44

"Accordingly, we assume there were two major melting events in the North Pacific realm," says Edith Maier. The method uses diatoms to determine how intensively the salinity of ocean surface waters has declined, e.g. The source of the freshwater: melting ice sheets, which covered much of the land masses surrounding the North Atlantic during the glacial. The only feasible explanation: the stones must have been transported incorporated to icebergs far away into the open North Pacific Ocean during times the North American coast was covered by an ice sheet. This water, produced during ice formation, is denser than warm water and therefore sinks into the deep ocean.

Treatment prevents symptoms of schizophrenia in tests with rats

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sciencedaily.com | Jul 12 @ 12:44

Our goal was to demonstrate this similarity so that spontaneously hypertensive rats could be used to study schizophrenia," Abílio said. Sodium nitroprusside is a salt that acts as a significant donor of nitric oxide, a powerful vasodilator. Results are achieved with daily doses treatmentLaboratory rats considered healthy and rats of the spontaneously hypertensive strain were submitted to two different types of treatment. The spontaneously hypertensive adult rats used in the experiment displayed hyperlocomotion, diminished social interaction, and emotional memory deficit. Sodium nitroprusside is a donor of nitric oxide, which is a neurotransmitter, a chemical that transmits signals between neurons.

Chemicals associated with oxidative stress may be essential to development

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sciencedaily.com | Jul 12 @ 12:44

Some level of molecules linked to oxidative stress may be essential to health and development, according to new animal studies. "This is really a study about the role of ROS as signaling molecules in normal development, but it has key applications for human health," Suter said. Reactive molecules derived from molecular oxygen, known as reactive oxygen species (ROS), increase dramatically in the body during times of environmental stress or disease. In a recent study, Suter's team looked at an enzyme that produces ROS in zebrafish embryos to see if it's essential to the development of their nervous systems. This stress can result in significant damage to cells and is associated with negative health consequences such as aging, male infertility, degenerative diseases and cancer.


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